Procedures

Comprehensive Gastrointestinal Health specializes in the following procedures. If you’re preparing for your procedure or would like to learn more about each one, click on the tab to get detailed information, helpful downloads, and preparation materials.

What is the colon?

The colon and rectum together are known as the large intestine. The colon is a long tube that takes in water and minerals from digested food and stores undigested solid waste.

What is a colonoscopy?

A colonoscopy involves looking at the colon from inside the body using a long, thin, flexible tube with a tiny camera on the end, through which the doctor can view your whole colon and rectum. The colonoscope is inserted into the anus and advanced through the entire colon and possibly a short distance into the small intestine (called the terminal ileum).

The image on the TV monitor is magnified many times so the doctor can see small changes in tissue. The colonoscope contains channels that allow the doctor to obtain biopsies (small pieces of tissue), remove polyps, and to introduce or withdraw fluid or air. If the doctor sees areas of inflammation or needs a sample of tissue to look for microscopic changes, biopsies or samples of tissue can be obtained.

How long does a colonoscopy take?

The procedure is generally about 20-30 minutes long. An anesthesiologist administers medications through the IV line. Most people have a deep sleep during the examination and are unaware that it was even performed.

Colonoscopy Preparation Documents

Additional Colonoscopy FAQs

WHY ARE COLONOSCOPIES RECOMMENDED?

Colorectal cancer (also known as colon cancer) is the 2nd most common cause of cancer deaths in the United States, yet it is one of the most preventable types of cancer. Approximately 1 in 20 people will develop colon cancer in their lifetime. Colorectal cancer is often curable when detected early.

Colonoscopy is the only test that allows a biopsy or removal of a polyp at the very same time it is first identified. Removing polyps during a colonoscopy could stop colon cancer from growing or even cure it.

There is no way to completely eliminate the risk of developing colorectal cancer, but the systematic detection and removal of colon polyps during screening colonoscopies is the single most important intervention to reduce your risk of developing colorectal cancer. As well, early detection of colorectal cancer by screening is the best way to improve the chance of a successful cancer cure.

HOW DOES A COLONOSCOPY HELP PREVENT COLORECTAL CANCER?

Most colon cancers develop from precancerous polyps, which are abnormal growths from the wall of the colon. If these precancerous polyps are left alone, they have the potential to grow into a cancer.

Not all colon polyps have the same risk of turning into colon cancer.  Precancerous polyps (adenomas and serrated polyps) could become cancerous; other types of polyps (hyperplastic, inflammatory) do not. 

By performing colonoscopies, we can find these precancerous polyps and remove them before they have a chance to transition into a cancer. The development of more than 75-90% of colorectal cancer can be avoided through early detection and removal of precancerous polyps. If people took advantage of screening tests, the vast majority of deaths from colon cancer could be prevented.

This also allows us to determine who needs a closer eye on them than the average population. Instead of colonoscopies every 10 years, some people need colonoscopies every 3-5 years depending on the number and size of polyps that are present.

WHAT ARE THE SYMPTOMS OF COLON CANCER?

Most early colorectal cancers produce no symptoms at all. This is why screening for colorectal cancer is so important.

Some possible symptoms associated with colorectal cancer should prompt a visit with your physician for an evaluation:

  • New onset of abdominal pain
  • Blood in or on the stool
  • A change in stool caliber or shape
  • A change in typical bowel habits, constipation, or diarrhea

BUT I HAVE NO SYMPTOMS, DO I REALLY NEED THIS NOW?

Precancerous polyps usually cause NO SYMPTOMS, and removal of these polyps prevents colon cancer.

Colon cancers found in patients with symptoms are more advanced and less likely to be cured. Colon cancers found in people WITHOUT symptoms are not as advanced and are more frequently cured.

The biggest risk factor for developing colorectal cancer is simply aging.

BUT NO ONE IN MY FAMILY HAS COLON POLYPS OR COLON CANCER, ARE YOU SURE I REALLY NEED TO DO THIS?

Although having a family history of colon polyps or colon cancer increases your risk of developing colon cancer, 75% of colon cancers DO NOT have a family history.

HOW DO I PREPARE FOR THE COLONOSCOPY?

Most patients say that this is the most unpleasant part of the experience. We have tried our best to make this process as easy as possible.

Please see the detailed instructions attached so that you can achieve the best preparation possible.

WHY IS THE PREPARATION SO IMPORTANT?

An excellent bowel preparation is necessary and critical because, unfortunately, the scope is unable to see through any remaining fecal debris. So any retained seeds/fibrous food or stool that are still present in the colon can block the ability to see a polyp or even a small cancer.

WHY DO I HAVE TO WAKE UP IN THE MIDDLE OF THE NIGHT TO DO PART OF THE PREPARATION?

This is called “split dose bowel preparation” and it has been shown to improve the quality of a colonoscopy.

Split dosing consists of drinking half of your colon cleanse the day before your colonoscopy and the other half on the day of the procedure.

Split dosing has been shown to be superior to same day preparation in clinical studies, BUT most importantly it decreases the likelihood that the procedure will need to be canceled and rescheduled because of a poor cleansing.

Note that this may require you to awaken early in the morning in order to complete the prep. Although inconvenient, the correct timing of drinking the prep is critical to obtaining a good colon preparation.

WHAT HAPPENS IS THE PREPARATION ISN’T OPTIMAL?

The colonoscopy procedure may take longer because the doctor will try to improve their views by taking time to clear debris.

The doctor may lack confidence that the inspection was as careful as they hope for and may therefore ask you to return for a follow up procedure at an earlier time than would be otherwise recommended (ex. 1 year, rather than 5 or 10 years).

If the preparation is very poor, the procedure may not be able to be completed safely and you will need to reschedule and repeat the procedure.

WHAT IF I TAKE BLOOD THINNERS?

Contact the physician who prescribes the medication to determine how to take it before and after your procedure.

Please do not assume that you can safely follow the same medication adjustments that have been made for your previous procedures.

These medications include:

  • Coumadin (warfarin)
  • Plavix (clopidogrel)
  • Brilinta (ticagrelor)
  • Effient (prasugrel)
  • Xarelto (rivaroxaban)
  • Eliquis (apixaban)
  • Pradaxa (dabigatran)
  • Savaysa (edoxaban)
  • Lovenox (enoxaparin)
  • Arixtra (fondaparinux)
  • Aggrenox (dipyridamole/aspirin)
  • Persantine (dipyridamole)
  • Ticlid (ticlopid)

WHAT IF I TAKE ASPIRIN?

If you are taking aspirin recommended by one of your doctors, please CONTINUE to take it.

If you do not have a heart, blood vessel, or clotting disorder and you are taking aspirin on your own without a doctor’s advice, please stop taking aspirin 5 days before the procedure.

WHAT IF I TAKE IRON?

Please STOP iron supplements in the week prior to the procedure.

WHAT IF I HAVE A TENDENCY TOWARD CONSTIPATION?

You can consider purchasing Miralax OTC (an over the counter laxative) and take 1-2 capfuls mixed in 8 oz. of fluid daily during the week prior to the procedure. This may help in clearing out a more constipated colon.

It seems counterintuitive, but avoiding the high fiber/high residue foods for the entire week prior to the procedure can help achieve the optimal preparation (see detailed list below).

You can also consider extending the time you drink clear liquids only to include two days prior to the procedure.

WHAT IF I AM WORRIED THAT I WILL HAVE NAUSEA WHEN I DRINK THE PREPARATION?

Please call the office and request a prescription for an anti-nausea medication.

DO I NEED TO MAKE ANY DIETARY CHANGES BEFORE THE PROCEDURE?

For at LEAST three days, up to a week if possible, AVOID HIGH RESIDUE FOODS. The preparation information includes specifics, but the list of foods to avoid includes:

  • Nuts
  • Popcorn
  • Seeds
  • Whole grains or high fiber grains
  • Beans and lentils
  • Many raw fruits and vegetables
  • Fruit

These high fiber foods can make the procedure more challenging, so make every effort to avoid them in the 3 days before the procedure.

However, if you do accidentally eat a high fiber food, it is not necessary to contact us or cancel/postpone the procedure.

WHAT IF I HAVE DIABETES?

Schedule your procedure for the morning if possible.

If you control your diabetes with ORAL medications alone, take your normal medication dose on the morning on the day prior to your procedure. Do NOT take any more diabetes medications until after the procedure is complete and you have eaten.

If you control your diabetes with INSULIN alone, for a colonoscopy, take ½ of your normal insulin dose the day before the procedure. Do NOT take any more diabetes medications until after the procedure is complete and you have eaten.

If you control your diabetes with BOTH INSULIN and ORAL medications, follow both sets of instructions as above.

If you utilize an INSULIN PUMP, please contact your endocrinologist for specific instructions.

Check your blood sugar frequently while drinking the preparation solution and the morning of your procedure.

HOW CAN I MAKE DRINKING THE PREPARATION LESS GROSS TASTING?

  • Keep the solution as COLD as possible.
  • Consider a citrus flavored clear liquid beverage to mix with the prep solution, as Suprep attempts to have a “citrus” flavor.
  • Consider not using your favorite beverage – you may have a negative association after pairing it with the colonoscopy prep.
  • Drink the prep through a straw placed far back on your tongue.
  • Consider holding your nose (or holding a lemon or lime under your nose while you drink).
  • Have a lemon, lime, or tart hard candy to suck on after drinking the prep solution.
  • Another option is to chew a piece of gum or gargle mouthwash to “clear out” the bad taste.

HOW LONG UNTIL THE PREPARATION STARTS WORKING?

Individual response to the preparation medications varies from person to person. Some people will begin to have multiple urgent bowel movements within 30 minutes of drinking the solution and others may not have a bowel movement for 3-4 hours.

I would encourage everyone to stay within close range of a bathroom after beginning to drink the preparation.

WHAT I FEEL NAUSEATED OR VOMIT DURING THE PREPARATION?

Feelings of nausea, bloating, or chills are common during the preparation process. These feelings are temporary and tend to improve after bowel movements begin.

If the nausea is significant or if you do vomit, STOP the preparation for 30-60 minutes. Restart the preparation when your nausea subsides and drink the remaining preparation at a slower pace. This may mean that you are awake later into the night doing the preparation, but that is preferable to vomiting and losing any progress you have made.

WHAT IF MY STOOLS ARE STILL FORMED WITH ONLY A COUPLE HOURS LEFT?

You may use a saline enema or tap water enema to help clear out residual stool. These items can be purchased from Amazon, Walgreens, CVS, or Target.

HOW CAN I PREVENT IRRITATION AROUND THE ANAL AREA?

  • Consider purchasing baby wipes with aloe for wiping (and/or the softest toilet paper that money can buy).
  • Pat yourself clean with toilet paper/baby wipe rather than wiping.
  • You may apply a petroleum based product or diaper rash ointment to the affected area and nearby skin to reduce discomfort from frequent stools.
  • If you have a history of discomfort from hemorrhoids, buy some preparation H or Tucks pads to use as well.

SHOULD I TAKE MY MEDICATIONS ON THE DAY OF THE PROCEDURE?

If you take medications for HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE, IRREGULAR HEART BEAT, SEIZURES, ASTHMA, THYROID, or PREDNISONE, then please take your medication with a sip of water the morning of your procedure.

Other medications can wait until after the procedure is completed.

WHAT SHOULD I BRING TO THE PROCEDURE?

The first and last names of all doctors you would like us to send a copy of procedure report.

Someone to drive you home.

  • Sedation is given during the procedure and although you may feel clear headed, your abilities are impaired.
  • If you have not arranged for someone to drive you home, your procedure will be cancelled.
  • You will not be able to drive, operate machinery, make any important or legal decisions, or return to work for the rest of the day.

Your insurance cards.

  • If you have specific questions about coverage for your upcoming procedure, please contact your insurance company.
  • Special note: although your upcoming colonoscopy may be scheduled as a screening procedure, if during the course of your screening the physician removed a polyp or performs a tissue biopsy, the procedure may be considered diagnostic and may not qualify for coverage as a screening service.
  • Insurance company policies vary regarding these matters and we encourage you to contact your insurance company to obtain their policy on these types of procedures.

Your medication list.

WHAT SHOULD I WEAR TO THE PROCEDURE?

  • Wear comfortable, loose fitting clothing that is easy to step into.
  • Wear flat shoes (skip the heels).
  • Do not wear jewelry or bring valuables.
  • You may wear makeup, but please skip the fragrances and body lotion.
  • You may wear contact lenses if you are able to take a 60 minute nap with your contacts in place.

HOW LONG WILL I BE THERE?

Every effort will be made to keep your appointment at the scheduled time, but in medicine, unexpected delays and emergencies may occur and your wait time may be prolonged.  We give each patient the attention needed for his or her procedure.

Typically we run on schedule and the duration from the time of drop off until you leave to go home runs approximately 2 hours.

WHAT SHOULD I EXPECT AFTER I ARRIVE?

After the administrative check in, a nurse will ask questions to ensure the patient understands the procedure and the reason it is planned.

The nurse will start an intravenous line (insert a needle into a vein in the hand or arm; feels similar to having blood drawn) to administer medications.

The vital signs (blood pressure, heart rate, and blood oxygen level) will be monitored before, during, and after the examination. The monitoring is not painful, though the first time the blood pressure cuff inflates it can be uncomfortable for 20-30 seconds.

WHAT HAPPENS IN THE PROCEDURE ROOM?

Vital sign monitors will be placed and values checked again before starting the sedating medications.

All patients will be given oxygen during the examination through plastic tubing prongs aimed into their nostrils.

You will position yourself to be lying on your left side.

The anesthesiologist will administer medications through the IV line. Most people have a deep sleep during the examination and are unaware that it was even performed.

HOW LONG DOES THE COLONOSCOPY ACTUALLY TAKE?

The average time in the procedure room is 20-30 minutes. Variability in the length of the procedure time depends upon an individual’s anatomy (some colons are easier to navigate than others), quality of the preparation, and quantity of polyps to remove or samples to obtain.

WHAT HAPPENS AFTER THE PROCEDURE?

You will be recovering for approximately 30-40 minutes.

Due to the lingering effects from the sedation medication, you may not remember the physician speaking to you. If you gave permission prior to the procedure, the doctor will review the findings with your family member or responsible adult that accompanies you.

You will be able to eat and drink right after the procedure is completed.

You will NOT be able to drive or return to work for the remainder of the day. Although you will be awake by the time you are discharged, the sedative medications cause changes in reflexes and judgment that cause a person to feel well but can interfere with the ability to make decisions, similar to the effects of alcohol.

WHAT IF I HAVE A COLD?

If your symptoms are mild and you have no fever, feel free to use Tylenol or other over the counter cold medications and proceed as scheduled.

If you have a fever, shortness of breath, severe cough or wheezing, please call and reschedule the procedure for when you are feeling better.

If you arrive the day of the procedure with these more concerning symptoms, the anesthesiologist may cancel the procedure in the interest of your safety.

WHAT IF I HAVE MY PERIOD THE DAY OF THE PROCEDURE?

No problem at all. Feel free to use a tampon and/or a pad.

WHAT IF I DO NOT WANT INFORMATION SHARED WITH MY RIDE?

No problem at all. Your doctor will confirm just prior to the procedure what you are comfortable with.

Although you may not remember the details of the procedure findings due to the sedation, all of the information is typed up and attached to the photos that were taken. If you have any questions later on when you are clear-headed, just call the office and we can review the details.

ARE COLONOSCOPIES SAFE?

Colonoscopy is a safe procedure and complications are rare, but they can occur.

Risks of colonoscopy include:

  • Adverse reactions to the medications used to sedate you are possible. By learning about your previous medication allergies or reactions and about health problems such as heart, lung, kidney, or liver disease, we will try to minimize the likelihood of an adverse reaction.
  • Medications can also cause irritation in the vein at the site of the intravenous line. If redness, swelling, or warmth occur, applying a warm wet towel to the site may relieve the discomfort. If the discomfort persists, please call the office.
  • Aspiration (inhaling) of food or fluids into the lungs, the risk of which can be minimized by not eating or drinking for the recommended period of time before the examination.
  • The colonoscope can cause a tear or hole in the tissue being examined, which is a serious problem, but fortunately, very uncommon (approximately 1 in every 3,000-5,000 colonoscopies).
  • Bleeding can occur from biopsies or the removal of polyps, but it is usually minimal and stops quickly or can be controlled.
  • Lastly, colonoscopy is the best test for preventing colon cancer, but it is not perfect. Due to visual limitations that can occur, it is possible to miss seeing a polyp.

What is an endoscopy?

An endoscopy (also called an upper GI scope or EGD) is a procedure that uses a long, thin, flexible tube with a tiny camera on the end, through which the doctor can examine your esophagus (swallowing tube), stomach, and the duodenum (the first part of the small intestine).  

The image on the TV monitor is magnified many times so the doctor can see small changes in tissue. If the doctor sees areas of inflammation, ulcers, polyps, or tumors or needs a sample of tissue to look for microscopic changes, biopsies or samples of tissue can be obtained.

How long does an endoscopy last?

The procedure is generally 5-15 minutes long. An anesthesiologist administers medications through the IV line. Most people have a deep sleep during the examination and are unaware that it was even performed.

Additional Endoscopy FAQs

HOW DO I PREPARE FOR THE ENDOSCOPY?

No solid food after midnight the night before your procedure.

You may have clear liquids up until 3 hours before the procedure. This includes coffee and tea (no milk or cream), Gatorade/Propel, juice without pulp, soda, and water.

For the procedure to be thorough and safe, it is necessary for your stomach and duodenum to be empty. Three hours before your scheduled procedure time, absolutely nothing more to eat or drink!

WHAT IF I TAKE BLOOD THINNERS?

Contact the physician who prescribes the medication to determine how to take it before and after your procedure.

Please do not assume that you can safely follow the same medication adjustments that have been made for your previous procedures.

These medications include:

  • Coumadin (warfarin)
  • Plavix (clopidogrel)
  • Brilinta (ticagrelor)
  • Effient (prasugrel)
  • Xarelto (rivaroxaban)
  • Eliquis (apixaban)
  • Pradaxa (dabigatran)
  • Savaysa (edoxaban)
  • Lovenox (enoxaparin)
  • Arixtra (fondaparinux)
  • Aggrenox (dipyridamole/aspirin)
  • Persantine (dipyridamole)
  • Ticlid (ticlopid)

WHAT IF I TAKE ASPIRIN?

If you are taking aspirin recommended by one of your doctors, please CONTINUE to take it.

If you do not have a heart, blood vessel, or clotting disorder and you are taking aspirin on your own without a doctor’s advice, please stop taking aspirin 5 days before the procedure.

WHAT IF I HAVE DIABETES?

Schedule your procedure for the morning if possible.

If you control your diabetes with ORAL medications alone, do NOT take any diabetes medications on the day of your procedure. You may resume your medications after the procedure is complete and you have eaten.

If you control your diabetes with INSULIN alone, do NOT take any insulin on the day of your procedure. You may resume your medications after the procedure is complete and you have eaten.

If you control your diabetes with BOTH INSULIN and ORAL medications. Follow both sets of instructions as above.

If you utilize an INSULIN PUMP, please contact your endocrinologist for specific instructions.

Check your blood sugar frequently the morning of your procedure.

SHOULD I TAKE MY MEDICATIONS ON THE DAY OF THE PROCEDURE?

If you take medications for HIGH BLOOD PRESSURE, IRREGULAR HEART BEAT, SEIZURES, ASTHMA, THYROID, or PREDNISONE, then please take your medication with a sip of water the morning of your procedure.

Other medications can wait until after the procedure is completed.

Check your blood sugar frequently the morning of your procedure.

WHAT SHOULD I BRING TO THE PROCEDURE?

The first and last names of all doctors you would like us to send a copy of procedure report.

Someone to drive you home.

  • Sedation is given during the procedure and although you may feel clear headed, your abilities are impaired.
  • If you have not arranged for someone to drive you home, your procedure will be cancelled.
  • You will not be able to drive, operate machinery, make any important or legal decisions, or return to work for the rest of the day.

Your insurance cards.

  • If you have specific questions about coverage for your upcoming procedure, please contact your insurance company.
  • Special note: although your upcoming colonoscopy may be scheduled as a screening procedure, if during the course of your screening the physician removed a polyp or performs a tissue biopsy, the procedure may be considered diagnostic and may not qualify for coverage as a screening service.
  • Insurance company policies vary regarding these matters and we encourage you to contact your insurance company to obtain their policy on these types of procedures.

Your medication list.

WHAT SHOULD I WEAR TO THE PROCEDURE?

  • Wear comfortable, loose fitting clothing that is easy to step into.
  • Wear flat shoes (skip the heels).
  • Do not wear jewelry or bring valuables.
  • You may wear makeup, but please skip the fragrances and body lotion.
  • You may wear contact lenses if you are able to take a 60 minute nap with your contacts in place.

HOW LONG WILL I BE THERE?

Every effort will be made to keep your appointment at the scheduled time, but in medicine, unexpected delays and emergencies may occur and your wait time may be prolonged.  We give each patient the attention needed for his or her procedure.

Typically we run on schedule and the duration from the time of drop off until you leave to go home runs approximately 2 hours.

WHAT SHOULD I EXPECT AFTER I ARRIVE?

After the administrative check in, a nurse will ask questions to ensure the patient understands the procedure and the reason it is planned.

The nurse will start an intravenous line (insert a needle into a vein in the hand or arm; feels similar to having blood drawn) to administer medications.

The vital signs (blood pressure, heart rate, and blood oxygen level) will be monitored before, during, and after the examination. The monitoring is not painful, though the first time the blood pressure cuff inflates it can be uncomfortable for 20-30 seconds.

WHAT HAPPENS IN THE PROCEDURE ROOM?

Vital sign monitors will be placed and values checked again before starting the sedating medications.

All patients will be given oxygen during the examination through plastic tubing prongs aimed into their nostrils.

You will position yourself to be lying on your left side.

A plastic mouth guard will is placed between the teeth to prevent damage to the teeth and scope.

The anesthesiologist will administer medications through the IV line. Most people have a deep sleep during the examination and are unaware that it was even performed.

HOW LONG DOES THE ENDOSCOPY ACTUALLY TAKE?

The procedure is generally about 5-15 minutes long.

WHAT HAPPENS AFTER THE PROCEDURE?

You will be recovering for approximately 30-40 minutes.

You may feel slightly bloated and belching will help to relieve this sensation.

You may have a sore throat. This usually lasts for less than 48 hours.

Due to the lingering effects from the sedation medication, you may not remember the physician speaking to you. If you gave permission prior to the procedure, the doctor will review the findings with your family member or responsible adult that accompanies you.

You will be able to eat and drink right after the procedure is completed.

You will NOT be able to drive or return to work for the remainder of the day. Although you will be awake by the time you are discharged, the sedative medications cause changes in reflexes and judgment that cause a person to feel well but can interfere with the ability to make decisions, similar to the effects of alcohol.

WHAT IF I HAVE A COLD?

If your symptoms are mild and you have no fever, feel free to use Tylenol or other over the counter cold medications and proceed as scheduled.

If you have a fever, shortness of breath, severe cough or wheezing, please call and reschedule the procedure for when you are feeling better.

If you arrive the day of the procedure with these more concerning symptoms, the anesthesiologist may cancel the procedure in the interest of your safety.

WHAT IF I DO NOT WANT INFORMATION SHARED WITH MY RIDE?

No problem at all. Your doctor will confirm just prior to the procedure what you are comfortable with.

Although you may not remember the details of the procedure findings due to the sedation, all of the information is typed up and attached to the photos that were taken. If you have any questions later on when you are clear-headed, just call the office and we can review the details.

ARE ENDOSCOPIES SAFE?

Endoscopy is a safe procedure and complications are rare, but they can occur.

Risks of endoscopy include:

  • Adverse reactions to the medications used to sedate you are possible. By learning about your previous medication allergies or reactions and about health problems such as heart, lung, kidney, or liver disease, we will try to minimize the likelihood of an adverse reaction.
  • Medications can also cause irritation in the vein at the site of the intravenous line. If redness, swelling, or warmth occur, applying a warm wet towel to the site may relieve the discomfort. If the discomfort persists, please call the office.
  • Aspiration (inhaling) of food or fluids into the lungs, the risk of which can be minimized by not eating or drinking for the recommended period of time before the examination.
  • The endoscope can cause a tear or hole in the tissue being examined, which is a serious problem, but fortunately, very uncommon (approximately 1 in every 5,000-10,000 endoscopies).
  • Bleeding can occur from biopsies or the removal of polyps, but it is usually minimal and stops quickly or can be controlled.

What is a flexible sigmoidoscopy?

A flexible sigmoidoscopy (also called a “flex sig” for short) allows the doctor to examine the end part of the colon and rectum.

A long, thin, flexible tube with a tiny camera on the end is inserted into the anus and advanced through the lower third of the colon and rectum. The scope blows air to inflate the colon to allow the doctor to more carefully examine the colon.

The doctor can insert instruments through the scope that can sample the colon tissue or remove polyps (abnormal growths from the wall of the colon).

Will I feel anything during the procedure?

Most individuals will be fully awake during the procedure because it is so short, approximately 10 minutes in duration.

If you are not sedated, then you will be able to feel the small tube being inserted and feel pressure, bloating, or slight cramping as the scope is advanced the short distance. Some individuals will receive sedating medications through an IV line and will not be likely to feel or remember any part of the procedure.

Click the link to learn more details.

What is a capsule endoscopy?

Capsule endoscopy allows for examination of the small intestine. This middle portion of your gastrointestinal tract, which includes three portions of the small intestine (duodenum, jejunum, ileum), cannot be easily reached with standard endoscopy methods. 

How is a capsule endoscopy performed?

You will be given a pill sized video camera for you to swallow. This camera has its own light source and takes pictures of your small intestine as it passes through. These pictures are sent to a small recording device you have to wear on your body. 

Your doctor will be able to view these pictures after they are downloaded.  This may provide information on structural changes in your small intestine.

Why is a capsule endoscopy done?

The most common reason for doing capsule endoscopy is to search for a cause of bleeding from the small intestine. It may also be useful for detecting polyps, Crohn’s disease, ulcers, and tumors of the small intestine.

Click the link to learn more details.

BRAND NEW ENDOSCOPY SUITE

Quality. Safety. Efficiency. Comfort.

We understand that endoscopic procedures will never be considered a “fun” experience. We aim to make the process as pleasant, effortless, and efficient as possible, while simultaneously maintaining the highest quality and safety standards. Learn more about how we are trying to make your colonoscopy experience easier.


Convenient Appointment Times to Fit Your Schedule.

  • EARLY MORNING appointments start at 7:00 a.m.
  • SATURDAY appointments are also available.

You Can Eat Breakfast on the Preparation Day.

  • Traditionally, gastroenterologists recommend a clear liquid diet without any solid food for the entire day before the procedure, which can mean up to 36 hours depending on the timing of the test.
  • Multiple studies have shown that allowing patients to EAT A LIGHT BREAKFAST and snack the day before a colonoscopy improves prep tolerance, increases patient satisfaction, and improves willingness to repeat the test in the future.
  • Most importantly, the quality of the bowel cleanout in these studies was identical whether the patient ate or not. A more recent study suggested that eating the day before a colonoscopy may actually improve the quality of the bowel cleanout.
  • Importantly, these meals do have restrictions. They must be “low residue” foods (no nuts, seeds, vegetables), which are more challenging to wash out later.

More flexible preparation options.

  • One size does not fit all.
  • Our goal is to provide SEVERAL EFFECTIVE OPTIONS so that you can find the most tolerable alternative for your taste preference.

Deluxe procedure experience.

  • Relax and recover in your own SOUNDPROOFED PRIVATE BAY with a television, charging station, and laptop workstation for you and your companion.
  • Studies have shown that listening to music can contribute to a more pleasant patient experience. You CHOOSE THE MUSIC preference to relax to while you are cared for!
  • Enjoy a DELICIOUS SMOOTHIE filled with important prebiotics and probiotics to help restore a healthy gut microbiome after your procedure.
  • We value your time and make every effort to optimize efficiency without affecting our careful devotion to detail. Average time from start to finish is ONLY TWO HOURS.
  • If your companion would like to run errands, check out this area map of all the NEARBY SHOPPING OPTIONS.
  • We devote MORE TIME to reviewing your procedure findings and EDUCATING YOU on their significance.

Highest quality technology and techniques.

  • State of the art OLYMPUS endoscopes.
  • Sedation provided by an ANESTHESIOLOGIST to enhance comfort and ensure rapid recovery time.
  • CARBON DIOXIDE is used for inflation to maximize comfort after the procedure since it rapidly dissolves.
  • Adherence to the most RIGOROUS STANDARDS for disinfection, sterilization and infection control. We regularly conduct infection control checks in areas where endoscopes are reprocessed to ensure compliance with all policies and guidelines.

Meticulous tracking of quality benchmarks with exceptional results.

ADENOMA DETECTION RATE

  • Adenomas are the precancerous polyps which have the potential to transition into colon cancers if left within the colon.
  • It is critically important that adenomas are properly detected and removed during screening colonoscopies.

The detection goals that have been established are to find at least one adenomatous polyp in:

  • >30% Men
  • >20% Women

Dr. Troy’s Adenoma Detection Rate:

  • 52.0% Men
  • 35.2% Women

SESSILE SERRATED POLYP DETECTION RATE

  • Sessile serrated adenomas are a type of difficult to detect precancerous colon polyp. There is controversy regarding the prevalence of this subset of polyps, with published studies varying from 2%-10%.
  • Although a standardized benchmark has not yet been determined, Dr. Troy tracks her sessile serrated polyp detection rate as well:
    • 13.7% Men
    • 14.0% Women

MEET OUR
ANESTHESIA TEAM

Critical care trained nurses and board-certified anesthesiologists provide first-rate anesthesia care.

Comprehensive Gastrointestinal Health, LLC has partnered with Mobile Anesthesiologists, LLC to coordinate outstanding care before, during, and after your procedure.

Mobile Anesthesiologists will communicate important instructions and reminders to you by email and phone to help you better prepare for your procedure.

Information within the emails does not contain protected health information.

You will receive a phone call reminding you to provide your health history, medications, and previous surgeries. Please provide this information using their secure online form. Here are simple instructions to help you access the secure form.

  • Go online to www.zzzmd.com
  • Select “Simple Admit” and then “Illinois (Chicago)”
  • Go to “Patients Start Here”
  • Enter password: MAC773NEW

NOTE: We will securely share the Health History information you have provided us with Mobile Anesthesiologists in efforts to reduce wasting your time with repetition of information. However, their trained staff will still confirm the accuracy of all information.

Contact Mobile Anesthesiologists

If you have any general questions, call Mobile Anesthesiologists at:
(
773) 355-5300

If you have any questions regarding the anesthesia you will be given or the online history form, call Mobile Anesthesiologists at:
(773) 756-5844

If you have any billing questions, before or after your procedure, please do not hesitate to contact the billing staff at Mobile Anesthesiologists at:
(855) 457-9900

WANT TO SCHEDULE A PROCEDURE?

Call us at (224) 407-4400 or fill in the appointment form.